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This property was listed for $499,000 in 2016. Cancer forces sale.

$325,000

 

Welcome to the wild Rockies, lush green forests, crystal clear streams, breathless views to leave you in awe, giving constant energy and inspiration.  The area offers a hiker's/photographer's/fisherman's/ naturalist's dream!  The property (173 acres), located 31 miles south of  the Canadian border off Montana Hwy 89,  on the east side of Glacier National Park along the N. fork of Cut Bank Creek, is 100% unimproved at this time, and is the closest property for sale to Glacier Park. 

 

Starting on the far western edge of the property are a network of glacial spring-fed ponds extending almost a mile westward.  And then, the Blackfeet Forest Reserve extends the rest of the way to the actual Park boundary.  So no one is likely to ever be building between you and the park.

 

The glacial spring water,which flows beneath the property, at an average of about 60 feet down is the purest, sweetest water anywhere, and will be there for many centuries.

 

Aspen forest covers much of the land, there are several excellent building sites, the soil is rich, fertile and deep, and the views are glorious.  This is virgin land.

 

The Mineral Rights are also included....

 

OIL -  There's oil down below.  For years, oil Companies pestered  me to lease the property, but I didn't.  Now the price of oil is too low.  Better that way.

 

Gold -   The Blackfeet were not miners.  They thought white man's attachment to gold was foolish, and they were not friendly to prospectors.  So, no one has ever explored the area for gold.  But if there is gold, I know exactly where to look.

 

There are several creeks marked "intermittent" but one has been flowing for the last 20 years, and another is always wet, even during the driest years.

 

Access is along the Park Service Road (Gravel), which forms the property's southern boundary (see map) and State Hwy 89(black top) crosses the northeast corner.  It's plowed all winter.  I was going to  build a garage, on the land where 89 crosses,  to park vehicles in winter when snow is deep and snowmobile to the house pulling a sled trailer with supplies when needed.  This garage would also make a good roadside stand to sell wares to tourists in summer.

 

For  power, the 20 year creek has a small waterfall which could be easily converted to a micro-hydro generating station.  Wind turbines produce well in the ample wind available. Some vertical axis turbines are small, efficient, quiet and will not impact birds.  Solar hot water was an 18th century technology and photovoltaics has become much more efficient and affordable.  I have a $1,500 antique "Round Oak" wood burning cook stove in MINT condition and a $2,100 soapstone stove I'll throw in if we close before they sell separately.  Lots of Aspen on the 173 makes great firewood.

 

On walking the perimeter of this 173 acres, I noticed that much of the barbed wire from many years ago is still there and is in good condition, just needing to be re-stretched and stapled to a tree.  Post holes will be easy to dig, as the soil is deep and rich with very good drainage.

 

Being right there at the Park's border, I included a few photos from inside Glacier National Park, your very own "back yard".  The Park is largely unexplored.  You could spend a lifetime of exhilarating adventure inside doing guided tours, research or discovery.  It's one of the greatest wonderlands of Nature in the world, if you are bold enough to enter, no fees, no river to cross, just walk or ride(horse)in.  We had hoped to do all this, but old  age came upon us too soon.  Now, we both have late-stage cancer.

 

On that small northeast corner of the 173  you'll find the corner post, put there in the first decade of the 1900's, with "WHITE CALF" stamped on it.  White Calf was the last of the great Blackfeet chiefs.  This was his  land. He picked it above all others  I hope you'll take the time to see why.

 

                                                      

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